Sunday, April 30, 2006

Week 7


Creative Computing

This week we solely looked at making some sound with Super Collider. Christian explained that we needed to create one AM SynthDef and one FM SynthDef and post the code and a recording of each in our blogs.

Here are my results

AM Synth



AM_Synth
(

//AM Synth
SynthDef("AM_Synth",

{
//Arguments
arg carrierFreq = 220,
carrierVol = 1;

//Variables
var carrier,
modulator;

//UGens
modulator = SinOsc.kr
(
freq: 220,
phase: 0,
mul: 0.5
);

carrier = SinOsc.ar
(
freq: carrierFreq,
phase: 0,
mul: carrierVol * modulator
);

//Output
Out.ar(0, carrier)
}
).load(s);

)

//Play
b = Synth("AM_Synth").play
b.set(\carrierFreq, 440);
b.set(\carrierFreq, 330);
b.set(\carrierFreq, 220);


I used a combination of David Cottle's examples and fellow classmates entrys to try and work out how to complete this question. Click here for a list of students blogs.

Haines, Christian. 2006. SuperCollider. Tutorial presented at the Electronic Music Unit, University of Adelaide, 27 April.


Workshop

This week in workshop we listened to three songs. My favourite and the one I was to focus my comments on was Voyage absolu des Unari vers Andromede by Iannis Xenakis. I found this to be an interesting composition to listen to. The piece featured an obvious space theme that reminded me of science-fiction type movies such as Star Trek. I felt that the sounds Xenakis created fell into the movie sound design genre rather than a musical composition as such although Xenakis does paint a sonic picture of what a journey to Andromede may be like.

I also felt I should comment on the second piece, In Flagranti by Gabriele Manca. Considering this piece was for slide guitar, I am unsure as to the exact relevance of this piece to our course.

Harris, David. 2006. Workshop presented at the Electronic Music Unit, EMU Space, University of Adelaide, 27 April.


Forum

Honours student Seb Tomczak spoke to us about some of his projects he created over previous years. Milkcrate was the main topic he spoke on. The idea behind Milkcrate was that participants spent 24 hours confined to a location to create music. Each participant brings a milk crate full of objects they wish to use to create music with. Sounds are recorded onto a computer then manipulated and arranged into quite interesting compositions. Seb showed us some footage of previous Milkcrates and some of the music that was created. It was interesting to see (and hear) what sounds the participants. I am definitely interested in being part of future Milkcrate sessions.

Here is a link to the Milkcrate website. http://www.milkcrate.com.au

Tomczak, Seb. "Presentation" Forum presented at the Electronic Music Unit, EMU Space, University of Adelaide, 27 April.

1 Comments:

At 1:45 AM, Blogger Martin said...

Nice code layout, very easy to read. Good work.

 

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